Google Stops Self-Censorship in China

March 25th, 2010 |

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Jeff Louis is a strategic media planner, brand project manager, blogger, and aspiring writer. He's intrigued by innovation overcoming adversity, survival of the fittest brand, history, reading, and similar fun stuff. He writes for sites and is the Public Relations and Advertising writer for the Chicago Examiner.

Google&ChinaThe die has been cast, and with it, Google’s future relations with China have entered the “big unknown.” That has to be a difficult pill for the Mount View, CA. corporation to swallow, as much of their success is a direct result of their anticipation and preparation for future events. Seriously, though, did anyone truly believe that China would be the first to suggest meeting at the bargaining table? Never.

No, China’s government is just like any Communist regime; they’d rather posture and save face than actually conduct any sort of meaningful sort of dialog. The Chinese thrive on secrecy, using fear as a weapon, and making life a real pisser for everyone.

According to David Drummond, SVP, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer, the process was arduous:

Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong. Users in Hong Kong will continue to receive their existing uncensored, traditional Chinese service, also from Google.com.hk. Due to the increased load on our Hong Kong servers and the complicated nature of these changes, users may see some slowdown in service or find some products temporarily inaccessible as we switch everything over.

Drummond appeared on CNBC and reported in the company blog that Google was prepared to leave China after they – and other online, high-tech companies – fell victim to hackers. Google traced the attacks to China (unofficially). According to Google’s co-founder Sergey Brinn, “On a business level, that decision to censor … was a net negative.”

After the two-month stalemate, it looks as if Google has regained their composure and decided to move forward despite the consequences.

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Jeff Louis
  • sarahregnier

    Does Google face the Chinese Government blocking access to this site within China? Is that possible to do?

  • sarahregnier

    Does Google face the Chinese Government blocking access to this site within China? Is that possible to do?